Digital technologies offer great possibilities for the everyday life and for businesses. Websites, emails, applications, connected devices…
But, if business people are enjoying digital tools as an opportunity for their activities, can you imagine how happier are malicious hackers?
Direct attacks, phishing, intercepting information, stealing data… So many possibilities from their point of view, as the growing use of digital technologies is making the attack surface growing too.

What can you do to protect your activity from malicious hackers’ attacks? Do you know ethical hacking?

Here are the sources of the statistics used in the video:

There are now more than 1.2 billion websites.
2017 Cybercrime Report. Cybersecurity Ventures. (p. 4)

In 2018, more than 800,000$ are spent every minute online.
http://www.visualcapitalist.com/internet-minute-2018/

49% of the global population uses mobile internet
Digital in 2018. We are social & Hootsuite. (p. 28)

Around 40 different apps are used per month.
2017 Retrospective. App Annie. (p. 13)
(to download here:
https://www.appannie.com/fr/insights/market-data/app-annie-2017-retrospective/#download )

A average office worker receives around 121 emails per day.
How many emails are sent every day? Templafy.

Intel estimates there will be 200 billion IoT object, which will be 26 smart objects per person.
40% of IoT are used in business and manufacturing, and 30% are used in healthcare
A guide to the Internet of Things. Intel.

77% of organisations were victimized by one or more successful cyberattacks in 2017.
2018 Cyberthreat Defense Report. Cyberedge Group. (p. 3)

Web application attacks increased by 10% between the 4th quarter 2016 and the 4th quarter 2017.
State of the Internet / Security – Q4 2017 Report. Akamai. (p. 2)

53% of infosec professionals reported experiencing spear phishing in 2017. [Spear phishing is a phishing strategy using specific information concerning the target to personalise a fake message.]
State of the Phish 2018. Wombat. (p. 4)

62% of respondents said they would blame the company that lost their data, even before blaming hackers.
Data Privacy & Security Report. RSA.  (p. 6)

Last accessed: 13rd August 2018.